Why did the big three meet at yalta roosevelt

Yalta Conference

why did the big three meet at yalta roosevelt

Seated left to right: Churchill, FD Roosevelt and Stalin with their respective foreign the 'Big Three' – met at Yalta to discuss issues which would shape the world to come. The Big Three were allies against Germany and her ally Japan. It was. In February , the Big Three – Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin - met again at With an Allied victory looking likely, the aim of the Yalta Conference was to. Oct 29, During the conference, the three leaders agreed to demand The Yalta Conference was a meeting of British prime minister Winston Franklin D. Roosevelt early in February as World War II was winding down. ) was the last of the World War II meetings held by the “Big Three” heads of state.

Months later, on 8 AugustRussia did declare war on Japan as promised at Yalta, three months after the end of the war in Europe, on the day before the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. Later, during the Cold War, Soviet intervention in the war against Japan was almost invariably overlooked by Western historians, but it is now considered as one of the key factors in the Japanese decision to surrender, along with the dropping of the atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

why did the big three meet at yalta roosevelt

The problem of Poland and Soviet relations The problem of Poland's future was a special focus of the Yalta conference. The Russian frontier with Poland would be moved westwards to the Curzon Line, a boundary previously suggested in the aftermath of the First World War.

Stalin agreed that free elections should be held in Poland as soon as possible. He also accepted Churchill's pleas that members of the Polish and Yugoslav governments-in-exile should be included in the new administrations of those countries.

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Russia also adhered to a 'Declaration on Liberated Europe' in which the 'Big Three' registered their desire for the establishment of democratic institutions in the countries that their forces had or were about to liberate from Nazi rule. Charles 'Chip' Bohlen of the US State Department, who acted as FDR's Russian interpreter, believed that each of the 'Big Three' had achieved their major goals at Yalta, while recognising that, 'there was a sense of frustration and some bitterness in regard to Poland'.

To American and British professional diplomats like Bohlen, the agreements reached at Yalta seemed on the surface to be 'realistic compromises between the various positions of each country'.

Stalin had made a genuine concession in finally agreeing to a French zone in Germany, while Churchill and Roosevelt had given in a great deal on Poland. But even then, Bohlen thought, the plan as finally agreed upon might well have resulted in a genuinely democratic Polish government if it had been carried out. Bohlen's State Department friend George Kennan was not so optimistic.

The Yalta Conference Explained

In a memorandum written just before Yalta, Kennan had given a gloomy and prescient assessment of future Soviet relations with the West. In it he saw no hope of co-operation with Stalin in a post-war Europe, rather an 'unavoidable conflict arising between the Allied need for stable, independent nations in Europe and a Soviet push to the west'.

why did the big three meet at yalta roosevelt

Within a very short time Stalin was refusing to carry out his part of the bargain on Poland, disregarding the Declaration on Liberated Europe. Anthony Eden wrote later that, 'at Yalta the Russians seemed relaxed and, so far as we could judge, friendly'. There were banquets at which innumerable toasts of vodka were drunk.

At one Stalin described Roosevelt as 'the chief forger of the instruments which led to the mobilisation of the world against Hitler'. He called Churchill 'the man who is born once in a hundred years' and 'the bravest statesman in the world'.

Eschewing vodka, the Prime Minister was described by one of his aides as 'drinking buckets of Caucasian champagne which would undermine the health of any ordinary man'.

Yalta Conference

Roosevelt's declining health was evident to everyone present. Accompanied by his daughter, Anna, the 7, mile journey to Yalta had left the President sapped of energy. Sir Alexander Cadogan, permanent head of the Foreign Office, wrote in his diary that 'Uncle Joe' Stalin was 'much the most impressive of the three men.

He is very quiet and restrained…the President flapped about and the P. When he did chip in, he never used a superfluous word, and spoke very much to the point'. James Byrnes wrote in his memoir that the Soviet dictator was 'a very likeable person', while Churchill toasted him as 'the mighty leader of a mighty nation whose people had driven the tyrants from her soil'. Yalta - a prophetic warning? Stalin, insisting that his doctors opposed any long trips, rejected these options.

Yalta Conference - HISTORY

Stalin's fear of flying also was a contributing factor in this decision. Each of the three leaders had his own agenda for post-war Germany and liberated Europe. Roosevelt wanted Soviet support in the U. Pacific War against Japan, specifically for the planned invasion of Japan Operation August Stormas well as Soviet participation in the United Nations ; Churchill pressed for free elections and democratic governments in Eastern and Central Europe specifically Poland ; and Stalin demanded a Soviet sphere of political influence in Eastern and Central Europe as an essential aspect of the USSR 's national security strategy.

Stalin's position at the conference was one which he felt was so strong that he could dictate terms.

Yalta Conference | World War II | catchsomeair.us

Byrnes"it was not a question of what we would let the Russians do, but what we could get the Russians to do. Stalin stated that "For the Soviet government, the question of Poland was one of honor" and security because Poland had served as a historical corridor for forces attempting to invade Russia. Contrasting with his prior statement, Stalin promised free elections in Poland despite the Soviet sponsored provisional government recently installed by him in Polish territories occupied by the Red Army.

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One Soviet precondition for a declaration of war against Japan was an American official recognition of Mongolian independence from China the Mongolian People's Republic had already been the Soviet satellite state from its own beginnings inthrough World War IIand a recognition of Soviet interests in the Manchurian railways and Port Arthur but not asking the Chinese to leaseas well as deprivation of Japanese soil such as Sakhalin and Kuril Islands to return to Russian custody since the Treaty of Portsmouth ; these were agreed without Chinese representation, consultation or consent, with the American desire to end war early thereby reducing American casualties.

Stalin agreed that the Soviet Union would enter the Pacific War three months after the defeat of Germany. Stalin pledged to Truman to keep the nationality of the Korean Peninsula intact as Soviet Union entered the war against Japan.

A Big Three meeting room Furthermore, the Soviets had agreed to join the United Nations, given the secret understanding of a voting formula with a veto power for permanent members of the Security Councilthus ensuring that each country could block unwanted decisions. At the time, the Red Army had occupied Poland completely and held much of Eastern Europe with a military power three times greater than Allied forces in the West[ citation needed ].

The Declaration of Liberated Europe did little to dispel the sphere of influence agreements that had been incorporated into armistice agreements.