Snopes meet the press obama 07 sept 2008

FACT CHECK: Obama Explains National Anthem Stance?

snopes meet the press obama 07 sept 2008

Jul 10, Then-Senator Barack Obama said on "Meet The Press" in , "As I've four years ago by reputable rumor-checking sites like catchsomeair.us Then-Senator Obama supposedly said this on the September 7, airing of. Senator and presidential candidate Barack Obama explains why he did not follow from a Meet The Press program that aired on NBC on September 7, Apr 22, Posted on April 22, Q: Did Obama say the National Anthem conveys a “ war-like message” and Also, thanks to catchsomeair.us for tracking down the source of this latest A media literacy game to detect misinformation.

snopes meet the press obama 07 sept 2008

So I've spent some time thinking about how I could best advance the cause of change and progress that we so desperately need The decisions that have been made in Washington these past six years, and the problems that have been ignored, have put our country in a precarious place. America's faced big problems before. But today, our leaders in Washington seem incapable of working together in a practical, commonsense way.

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Politics has become so bitter and partisan, so gummed up by money and influence, that we can't tackle the big problems that demand solutions. In a video posting, announcing his candidacy for President of the United States 16 January There are countless reasons the American people have lost confidence in the President's Iraq policy, but chief among them has been the administration's insistence on making promises and assurances about progress and victory that do not appear to be grounded in the reality of the facts.

We have been told we would be greeted as liberators. We have been promised the insurgency was in its last throes.

Obama's 'Sealed' Records - catchsomeair.us

We have been assured again and again that we are making progress and that the Iraqis would soon stand up so we could stand down and our brave sons and daughters could start coming home.

We have been asked to wait, we have been asked to be patient, and we have been asked to give the President and the new Iraqi Government 6 more months, and then 6 more months after that, and then 6 more months after that. I have also tried to act responsibly in that opposition to ensure that, having made the decision to go into Iraq, we provide our troops, who perform valiantly, the support they need to complete their mission.

I have also stated publicly that I think we have both strategic interests and humanitarian responsibilities in ensuring that Iraq is as stable as possible under the circumstances.

Finally, I said publicly that it is my preference not to micromanage the Commander-in-Chief in the prosecution of war. Ultimately, I do not believe that is the ideal role for Congress to play. But at a certain point, we have to draw a line. At a certain point, the American people have to have some confidence that we are not simply going down this blind alley in perpetuity. When it comes to the war in Iraq, the time for promises and assurances, for waiting and patience is over.

Too many lives have been lost and too many billions have been spent for us to trust the President on another tried-and-failed policy, opposed by generals and experts, opposed by Democrats and Republicans, opposed by Americans and even the Iraqis themselves.

It is time to change our policy. It is time to give Iraqis their country back, and it is time to refocus America's effort on the wider struggle against terror yet to be won. Our troops have done all that we have asked them to do and more. But no amount of American soldiers can solve the political differences at the heart of somebody else's civil war, nor settle the grievances in the hearts of the combatants.

It is my firm belief that the responsible course of action - for the United States, for Iraq, and for our troops - is to oppose this reckless escalation and to pursue a new policy.

This policy that I've laid out is consistent with what I have advocated for well over a year, with many of the recommendations of the bipartisan Iraq Study Group, and with what the American people demanded in the November election.

When it comes to the war in Iraq, the time for promises and assurances, for waiting and patience, is over. Too many lives have been lost and too many billions have been spent for us to trust the President on another tried and failed policy opposed by generals and experts, Democrats and Republicans, Americans and many of the Iraqis themselves. The fact that I'm running for president right now is an indication of how much I love this country, because it has given everything to me.

This country has been a great source of good. I've lived overseas and seen the difference between America and what it stands for and what other countries oftentimes stand for and where they fall short.

I've, I've said before, my story's not possible in any other country on earth. You know, when I think about this country, I think about my grandfather fighting in World War II in Patton's army; I think about my grandmother staying home--staying back and, and working on a bomber assembly line while she was raising a kid in--as, as they're coming out of a depression.

And, and so this country is the--it defines, for me, what's possible for not just me, but for so many people who see this as a beacon of good, including my father, who originally came here seeking an education in this country. So I love this country. It is what I have been fighting for, a--that America lives up to its values and its ideals. And that's what I think the people of Indiana and that's what the people of North Carolina are looking for right now.

What, what--they love this country as well, but what they've believe is that the values that have built this country, the belief in--that hard work is rewarded, that you can raise a family and have health care, and buy a home and retire with dignity and respect, that those things feel like they're slipping away.

And what this campaign's about, what I think this moment is about in America is whether or not we are going to fight for those ideals that make this country great, and, and if we miss that opportunity, then I think we will be doing a disservice to future generations. So I'm happy to have a debate, an argument with the Republican Party or any of my opponents about what this country means, what makes it great. And what makes it great, ultimately, is its people and how the American people are able to live out their American dream.

And right now, all too often Washington is failing in helping them to live out that American dream, and I--that's what I think this election's going to be about in November. The National Journal says that in 26 of the 29 contests you've been involved in you have lost white voters who do not have college degrees. How do you connect with them? Well, you know, first of all, I think we got to give Senator Clinton some credit.

I mean, she's a pretty formidable candidate, and she possesses the best brand name in Democratic politics. And her and her husband have been campaigning actively. People have fond memories of some of the work that they did in the '90s. And so the fact that she has won some of those contests in some demographic groups shouldn't be surprising.

I mean, I'm the underdog. I, I came into this thing with everybody anticipating that we would be blown away. And if I was worrying about polls and, you know, some of this, some of this analysis, I probably wouldn't have gotten into the race in the first place. What's remarkable is how well we've done. Now, what I do believe is that it is important for the American people to understand my story and how it connects to theirs.

I think it's important for people to understand not only that I was raised by a single mom and, and my grandparents, and the values of hard work and decency and honesty that they've passed on to me, that those are values that are rooted in the heartland of America and small-town America. My, my wife, Michelle, you mentioned earlier, you know, when I think about her father, who worked as a shift worker for the city of Chicago, despite having MS, got up every single day and went to work, was able to raise a family and send his two kids to college and, and support a family of four on a single salary.

snopes meet the press obama 07 sept 2008

I think about your father and the fact that, that your dad, Tim, looked nothing like Michelle's dad, but they lived that same American dream and, and they had those same core values.

And those are the values of millions of people all across the country.

The Coke theme song and more ridiculous allegations

And my job in this campaign is to communicate the fact that not only are those values at the core of what this country's about, not only are those values what make me patriotic, but those are the values that have to be fought for because that American dream is slipping away.

Advertise Those same individuals who are like Michelle's dad, who are like my grandparents, who are like your dad, they can't make it now doing the same things that they used to do.

No matter how hard they work, they're falling behind. No matter how hard they work, they're at risk of losing their home or losing their pension.

That's what this campaign's about, and that's what we've been fighting for, and, and that's why, ultimately, I'm confident not only are we going to win this nomination, but I also believe that we're going to win this general election because that is what the American people understand. Unless we are able to create the kinds of opportunities for ordinary Americans that have been slipping away over the last seven years, with wages and incomes actually going down even during an economic expansion, then, you know, we're not going to pass on the kind of America to our children that we want to.

One issue that has really defined the two campaigns here in Indiana is this debate over gasoline This is Hillary Clinton's ad talking about you. Videotape of political ad Narrator: Now gas prices are skyrocketing, and she's ready to act again.

Hillary's plan, use the windfall profits of the oil companies to pay to suspend the gas tax this summer. Barack Obama says no, again. People are hurting, it's time for a president who's ready to take action now. Why are you against giving taxpayers in Indiana, North Carolina, a relief from federal gasoline tax this summer?

You're right, Tim, this defines, I think, the difference between myself and Senator Clinton. This gas tax, which was first proposed by John McCain and then quickly adopted by Senator Clinton, is a classic Washington gimmick. It, it is a political response to a serious problem that we have neglected for decades. Now, here's, here's the upshot.

You're looking at suspending a gas tax for three months. That's assuming that the oil companies don't step in and raise prices by the same amount that the tax has been reduced. And, by the way, I have some experience on this because in Illinois we tried this when I was in the state legislature, and that's exactly what happened. The oil companies, the retailers were the ones who ended up benefiting. You voted for it, too. And, and that's my point.

I voted for it, and then six months later we took a look, and consumers had not benefited at all, but we had lost revenue. So you learned from a wrong vote. Yeah, I learned from a mistake. And, in addition, what happens is, is that this would come out of the Federal Highway Fund that we use to rebuild our roads and our bridges. And if we don't have that fund, then we're looking at thousands of jobs being lost in Indiana and in North Carolina.

Now, Senator Clinton says that she's going to use the windfall profits tax to fill it. First of all, she's already said that she's going to use the windfall profits tax for something else, as I have, and, and that is to invest in clean energy and, and other important measures.

So that money, she's already spending twice. More importantly, nobody thinks that George Bush is actually going to spend--or is actually going to sign a law for windfall profits taxes, so that's not going to happen this summer. So what this is, is a strategy to get through the next election. We don't think it's going to work, but we think it's a good issue to use in a campaign.

We, we, we don't deal with the serious issues that are in front of us, we try to figure out what's going to poll well and what can we do to get through the next election. And what I've said is, look, people do need serious relief. They are, are getting hammered. I mean, people who--can't go on job searches because they can't fill up their gas tank.

snopes meet the press obama 07 sept 2008

And, you know, I have to say that if Senator Clinton or John McCain had stood up in previous years for increases in fuel efficiency standards, in getting serious about a--an energy policy that is freeing ourselves from dependence on foreign oil, then we would not be in this same situation in the first place.

Now is the time for us to act, and I think the people of Indiana and North Carolina understand that. Ethanol, very important to your state, very important to, to Iowa.

Obama and the National Anthem - catchsomeair.us

Here's the reports on that. This year, about a quarter of U.

snopes meet the press obama 07 sept 2008

That has helped farmers Would you be willing to change ethanol subsidies or suspend some of these requirements so that people are not using corn for ethanol, but using corn for food and lowering food prices. Well, look, we, we've got a serious food problem around the world.

snopes meet the press obama 07 sept 2008

We, we've got rising food prices here in the United States. In other countries we're seeing riots because of, because of the lack of food supplies. So this is something that we're going to have to deal with. There are a number of factors that go into this. Changes in climate are contributing. The, the fact that in a lot of countries, you know, we've had problems getting food supplies to poor countries because the wealthier countries have reduced their stockpiles in, in serious ways.

And so there're a whole host of reasons why we're seeing problems with food supply. There's no doubt that biofuels may be contributing to it. And what I've said is, my top priority is making sure that people are able to get enough to eat.

And if it turns out that we've got to make changes in our ethanol policy to help people get something to eat, then that's got to be the step we take. But I also believe that ethanol has been a important transitional tool for us to start dealing with our long-term energy crisis ultimately.

Over time we're going to shift to cellulosic ethanol, where we're not using food stocks but we're using wood chips, we're using, you know, prairie grass, we're using How long before our automobiles are off of gasoline oil and, and using something like an alternative fuel?

And the technologies exist right now for plug-in hybrids. The image on the right was taken of President Obama delivering a weekly address on January 24, Notice the US Flag pinned to his left lapel. Obama Explains his Failure to Salute eRumor: It is true that Obama was photographed at a campaign event in Iowa failing to hold his hand over his heart in salute of the flag during the National Anthem. But this particular eRumor, which quotes him as saying that the American flag is " It's satire, not an actual quote from Obama.

Other versions of this eRumor have been circulating the Internet including one popular variation about an account from a Meet The Press program that aired on NBC on September 7, During the interview U. S, Air Force Retired General Bill Ginn allegedly asked candidate Obama why he did not follow proper protocol and salute the flag during the playing the national anthem. This is also fiction. There were prerecorded videos of Obama on the program.

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