Relationship between teacher student pdf editor

The Best PDF Editor for Teachers: Free PDF Tools for Educators | PDF Pro blog

relationship between teacher student pdf editor

The order fulfillment process described in this article only applies to perpetual Student Teacher edition products purchased in EMEA and APAC. PDF | A number of studies have found that teacher-student interaction plays a between specific teacher-student relationships, levels of student .. mainly asked to shoot short video clips, and edit the resulting video, adding. learning between the teachers and students exchange activi- ties and the formation of and students is the basic relationship between students and teachers .. and Physical Education, Column Editor: K.A.R. Richards, Strate- gies , vol. 27, no.

And that's money that isn't going in to other programs like music and art classes, student supplies and other costs that help your students learn and have a better educational experience.

The Best PDF Editor for Teachers: Free PDF Tools for Educators

On the other hand, digital files are easier to manage and share with colleagues, parents and students, cheap to store, and make searching for the info you need - without risking a paper cut and a headache - much more simple. Curious about how you can use PDFs in your classroom? Here are our tips for PDFs for Teachers. Classroom organization Easily edit seating charts, class lesson plans, lesson and semester planning checklists, and classroom rules.

With PDF Pro's user-friendly tools, all the tasks you need to complete at the beginning of the semester can be done online and easily shared over email. Erase and add text to PDF files, merge separate files into one, and sign PDFs - all on your computer, no printer needed. You can also convert the most popular file types into PDF - so you can use PowerPoint, Excel, image files and more to create new PDF files for the documents and information you need.

For most schools, teachers are provided with the same paperwork year after year. By saving these files to your computer, and editing them digitally, you can quickly update them for the next year - and get a jump on your schoolwork.

Free PDF Editor for Teachers and Students

As might be expected from this variation and diffuseness in definitions of teacher support, none of them specify a direct relationship between teacher support and students' academic emotions, making it difficult to determine the salient levers for intervention and support. Therefore, we conduct a meta-analysis to integrate these diverse frameworks and streamline the knowledge base, thereby promoting the development of this field.

relationship between teacher student pdf editor

Academic emotions Academic emotions refer to the emotional experience of learning and teachingincluding enjoyment, hopelessness, boredom, anxiety, and anger Pekrun et al. Researchers have generally divided academic emotions into two categories: According to Pekrun et al.

The Funniest TEACHER - STUDENT Texts

Based on the literature, the current study define PAEs as including interest, hope, enjoyment, pride, calmness, contentment, and relief; and NAEs as including shame, anxiety, anger, worry, boredom, depression, fatigue, and hopelessness. The relationship between teacher support and students' academic emotions Many empirical studies have shown that students with more teacher support have higher PAEs or lower NAEs.

Specifically, students with more teacher support have more enjoyment, interest, hope, pride, or relief PAEs ; or less anxiety, depression, shame, anger, worry, boredom, or hopelessness NAEs Ahmed et al. As the effect sizes differ substantially among these studies Skinner et al.

However, these studies only partly verified the underlying phenomena, as some studies had limitations such as convenience sampling or ignoring sample size —resulting in low reliability and reducing the quality of the research.

The Relationship between Teacher Support and Students' Academic Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

Therefore, to determine clearly the link between teacher support and students' academic emotions, a meta-analysis is needed. Through a review of past empirical research on teacher support and students' academic emotions, we found that many effect sizes were heterogeneous, suggesting that moderators might account for these differences.

Specifically, we examined the potential moderating roles of students' cultures, ages, and genders. Potential moderators of the link between teacher support and students' academic emotions Culture Several studies have implied that culture may influence the association between teacher support and students' academic emotions. For example, Karagiannidis et al.

In contrast, King et al. Age The link between teacher support and students' academic emotions might differ by the latter's Klem and Connell, ; Frenzel et al. For example, past studies found that the relation between teacher support and indicators of PAE was lowest among middle school students and highest among university students, relative to elementary and high school students Aldridge et al. Meanwhile the link between teacher support and indicators of NAE was strongest for middle school students Taylor, ; Huang et al.

relationship between teacher student pdf editor

According to these findings, we expect age to moderate the relation between teacher support and students' academic emotions. Gender Female students tend to receive more teacher support than do male students Lutz, ; Baumeister and Sommer,and several empirical studies have shown gender differences in the link between teacher support and indicators of students' academic emotions, such as interest, depression, anxiety Van Ryzin et al.

According to these findings, we expect gender to moderate the correlation between teacher support and students' academic emotions. Study purpose This meta-analysis of 65 studies analyzed the relations between teacher support and students' academic emotions positive and negative and their moderators. Specifically, this study examined: We obtained full-text versions of articles from libraries when they could not be found online, limiting ourselves to articles written in English.

We used inclusion and exclusion criteria described in the next subsections to analyze and filter the collected studies. Literature exclusion criteria We included articles based on the following criteria: After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 65 articles remained. Coding To facilitate meta-analysis, feature coding was conducted on 65 articles. We considered the following variables: Table 1 Studies included in the meta-analysis.