Fahrenheit 451 mildred and montag relationship quizzes

Fahrenheit Test | Final Test - Medium

fahrenheit 451 mildred and montag relationship quizzes

Fahrenheit Reading, Discussion and Quiz Schedule. Part One: The How is Montag's relationship with Clarisse different from his relationship with Mildred?. Start studying Fahrenheit Part 2 Quiz Study Guide. Part 2 begins with Montag reading to Mildred all afternoon. . mold them into what they want while leaving the parent-child relationship negative. Fahrenheit Parts All Questions. Fahrenheit be held accountable for the readings through classroom discussions and quizzes. Mildred (how she represents society, what her problems are, her relationship with Faber (his ideas on books/ideas, his effect on Montag).

You must then write a short page paper that addresses the following: How did you choose the item that you censored? What values are you trying to uphold by censoring the item the way that you did?

fahrenheit 451 mildred and montag relationship quizzes

Both the original and censored works must be handed in with the paper. To assist you with this task, you may want to investigate the following questions.

You do not need to answer all of them, but they will certainly help you to understand the underlying issues involved in censorship. How does this relate to the society you live in as the Head of the Sanitation Committee? Why might it be necessary for their society to function? What would society look like without it? Public Broadcasting System Looking for a place to start?

The Public Broadcasting System provides a definition of censorship, criteria and codes for various forms of media, and various means and methods of putting it into practice. This is a great site for helping you narrow your focus! How does it compare to censorship in American culture? The others would never do that.

Did You Red Fahrenheit - ProProfs Quiz

You can see that Montag and Clarisse had a connection right off the bat. In the movie Wall-E I can see many connections to the relationships that the characters in Fahrenheit have. In Wall-E the humans on board the Axiom did communicate with each other, but it was while they were using something similar to Skype saracamillia.

In Fahrenheit while they might not use Skype to communicate with each other when they watch television in their parlor rooms the television is a wall unit and they could have all four walls in their parlor be televisions.

Fahrenheit 451 Test | Final Test - Medium

It seems that in Wall-E the use if technology is a little worse than that in Fahrenheit with the fact that no one has to walk since they have their floating chair that do virtually everything for them saracamillia. The characters of Fahrenheit have the seashell radio: Montag goes on to think that he should need to buy himself his own Seashell in order to talk to her at night.

In Fahrenheit it has yet to get to the point where people no longer walk to where they want to go or talk to people in person. I can see in the future of Fahrenheit that the people become so much more obsessed with the technology they have that it gets to the point where they have technology to do every sale little thing for them and then everyone would be morbidly obese and die and that would take care of one of the problems that too much technology will cause.

All of these technologies get in the way of human relationships having actual connections within the relationship. In conclusion, it is good to have strong connections in relationships.

"Fahrenheit " pg. by Ms Wilkens on Prezi

If the relationship does not have a good or strong connection then one of the people in the relationship is bound to turn on the other person. When a relationship does have a good or strong connection then the people in that relationship are happy and are much less likely to turn on one another. He views himself in the mirror after a night of burning and finds himself grinning, and he thinks that all firemen must look like white men masquerading as minstrels, grinning behind their "burnt-corked" masks.

fahrenheit 451 mildred and montag relationship quizzes

Later, as Montag goes to sleep, he realizes that his smile still grips his face muscles, even in the dark. The language — "fiery smile still gripped by his face muscles" — suggests that his smile is artificial and forced. Soon he will understand that this small bit of truth is an immense truth for himself. At present, Montag seems to enjoy his job as a fireman.

Fahrenheit 451 - Part 1 (Mildred Overdoses) - Summary and Analysis - Ray Bradbury

He is a "smiling fireman. Montag smiles, but he is not happy. The smile, just like his "burnt-corked" face, is a mask. You discover almost immediately when Montag meets Clarisse McClellan that he is not happy. By comparing and contrasting the two characters, you can see that Bradbury portrays Clarisse as spontaneous and naturally curious; Montag is insincere and jaded.

Clarisse has no rigid daily schedule: Montag is a creature of habit. She speaks to him of the beauties of life, the man in the moon, the early morning dew, and the enjoyment she receives from smelling and looking at things.

Montag, however, has never concerned himself with such "insignificant" matters.

Fahrenheit 451

Clarisse lives with her mother, father, and uncle; Montag has no family other than his wife, and as you soon discover, his home life is unhappy.

Clarisse accepts Montag for what he is; Montag finds Clarisse's peculiarities that is, her individuality slightly annoying. Despite all these differences, the two are attracted to one another. Clarisse's vivacity is infectious, and Montag finds her unusual perspectives about life intriguing.

Indeed, she is partly responsible for Montag's change in attitude. She makes Montag think of things that he has never thought of before, and she forces him to consider ideas that he has never contemplated. Moreover, Montag seems to find something in Clarisse that is a long-repressed part of himself: Impossible; for how many people did you know who refracted your own light to you?

She speaks to him about her delight in letting the rain fall upon her face and into her mouth. Later, Montag, too, turns his head upward into the early November rain in order to catch a mouthful of the cool liquid. In effect, Clarisse, in a very few meetings, exerts a powerful influence on Montag, and he is never able to find happiness in his former life again. Yet, if the water imagery of this early scene implies rebirth or regeneration, this imagery is also associated with the artificiality of the peoples' lives in the futuristic dystopia of Fahrenheit Each night before she goes to bed, Mildred places small, Seashell Radios into her ears, and the music whisks her away from the dreariness of her everyday reality.

fahrenheit 451 mildred and montag relationship quizzes

As Montag lies in bed, the room seems empty because the waves of sound "came in and bore her [Mildred] off on their great tides of sound, floating her, wide-eyed, toward morning. She has abandoned reality through her use of these tiny technological wonders that instill mindlessness. The Seashell Radios serve as an escape for Millie because they help her avoid thoughts. Although she would never — or could never — admit it, Millie Montag isn't happy either. Her need for the Seashell Radios in order to sleep is insignificant when measured against her addiction to tranquilizers and sleeping pills.

When Millie overdoses on sleeping pills which Bradbury never fully explains as accidental or suicidalshe is saved by a machine and two machinelike men who don't care whether she lives or dies.

This machine, which pumps out a person's stomach and replaces blood with a fresh supply, is used to foil up to ten unexplainable suicide attempts a night — a machine that is very telling of the social climate. Montag comes to realize that their inability to discuss the suicide attempt suggests the profound estrangement that exists between them.

He discovers that their marriage is in shambles. Neither he nor Millie can remember anything about their past together, and Millie is more interested in her three-wall television family. The TV is another means that Mildred uses to escape reality and, perhaps, her unhappiness with life and with Montag. She neglects Montag and lavishes her attention instead upon her television relatives. The television family that never says or does anything significant, the high-speed abandon with which she drives their car, and even the overdose of sleeping pills are all indicators for Montag that their life together is meaningless.

For Montag, these discoveries are difficult to express; he is only dimly cognizant of his unhappiness — and Millie's — when he has the first incident with the Mechanical Hound. In some sense, the Hound's distrust of Montag — its growl — is a barometer of Montag's growing unhappiness.

Captain Beatty intuitively senses Montag's growing discontent with his life and job. Beatty is an intelligent but ultimately cynical man. He is, paradoxically, well-read and is even willing to allow Montag to have some slight curiosity about what the books contain. However, Beatty, as a defender of the state one who has compromised his morality for social stabilitybelieves that all intellectual curiosity and hunger for knowledge must be quelled for the good of the state — for conformity.

fahrenheit 451 mildred and montag relationship quizzes

He even allows for the perversion of history as it appears in Firemen of America: When the curiosity for books begins to affect an individual's conduct and a person's ability to conform — as it does Montag's — the curiosity must be severely punished.

When Montag is called to an unidentified woman's house "in the ancient part of the city," he is amazed to find that the woman will not abandon her home or her books. The woman is clearly a martyr, and her martyrdom profoundly affects Montag. Before she is burned, the woman makes a strange yet significant statement: He was convicted of heresy and sentenced to burn at the stake with a fellow heretic, Hugh Latimer. Latimer's words to Ridley are the ones that the unidentified woman alludes to before she is set aflame.

Note that a couple visual metaphors for knowledge were traditionally of a woman, sometimes bathed in bright light or holding a burning torch. Ironically, the woman's words are prophetic; through her own death by fire, Montag's discontent drives him to an investigation of what books really are, what they contain, and what fulfillment they offer.

Montag is unable to understand the change that is taking place within him. With a sickening awareness, he realizes that "[a]lways at night the alarm comes. Is it because fire is prettier by night? More spectacle, a better show?